Fair Use disclaimer

All music presented on this site is shared under the premise of "fair use"; this site is solely intended for the purpose of education and critique. If you are a rights holder to any of the music presented and wish for it to be removed, simply contact me directly and it will be taken down.

Sunday, March 31, 2013

THE VALENTINOS - WHAT ABOUT ME

The easy shuffling groove and gorgeous vocals almost mask the NASTY vengeful undercurrents of the lyrics of this song. They're downright cathartic, and I think we've all been there.

Hailing from Cleveland, OH, The Valentinos were made up of the Womack brothers (Bobby, Curtis, Harry, Friendly Jr, and Cecil). Curtis and Bobby were discovered as young teenagers in 1956 by Sam Cooke while the brothers were singing gospel music. Four years later, Cooke had the group travel to California where he signed them to his SAR record label. The group initially wanted to record only gospel material, but their gospel debut flopped. Thanks to an arrangement with Cooke, the group agreed to branch out into the world of secular music, although their powerhouse singing never lost its roots in the church.

During the sixties, the group released a string of excellent singles, but never achieved the massive success they deserved as a group; however, the Womack brothers' composition "It's All Over Now" became a massive hit for the Rolling Stones.

The group grieved the turmoil of Cooke's death, and the drama of Bobby Womack's marriage to Cooke's widow,which practically ruined their career.

from 1966...

THE VALENTINOS - WHAT ABOUT ME

Saturday, March 30, 2013

TONI LAMARR - JUST IN THE NICK OF TIME

The mysterious Toni LaMarr had two releases on Buddah records, and seemingly there are no other records cut by her (at least under that name).

This is a lovely record with a gorgeous vibraphone-led groove with gorgeous vocals from Ms Lamarr.

Van McCoy leaves his indelible stamp here, both with his ethereal backing vocals and also songwriting and production talents.

from 1967...

TONI LAMARR - JUST IN THE NICK OF TIME
 

Friday, March 29, 2013

TONI BASIL - BREAKAWAY


(originally posted 7/2008)

Sixteen years before her massive pop success with the polarizing "Mickey", Toni Basil (already a veteran professional dancer at age 23) cut this single. This record is easily one of the top choices I would make of records that SHOULD have been massive. Unfortunately this incredible 45 made no impact commercially, but in later years it became both a Northern Soul anthem as well as a pivotal track of female independence; feminism that is far more tuneful than "I Am Woman"!

The song accompanied the release of a short film of the same title that shows Toni in various states of undress, and its scandalous nature probably would have hurt this records' chance of becoming a hit had it been seen by more than a handful of people.

In the years between this release and that of "Mickey", Toni did not release any more records. Her career was active, and (among dozens of other high profile gigs) she made quite an impression in her appearance in Easy Rider, choreographed and danced with Davy Jones during the brilliant "Daddy's Song" sequence of The Monkees Head film, and choreographed The Talking Heads "Once In A Lifetime" video.

Songwriter Ed Cobb also wrote "Tainted Love", and was instrumental in the recordings of Gloria Jones and The Chocolate Watchband.

from 1966...

TONI BASIL - BREAKAWAY

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

JOHN LEE HOOKER - YOU GOTTA SHAKE IT UP AND GO

If there were a Mount Rushmore of the blues, John Lee Hooker would certainly be a candidate to be part of the monument. And in his monumental body of recorded works, here lies what is perhaps his greatest ever r&b track, and when the boogie man says "shake it up and go" one better do as told.

My only question is what's with the off rhythm knocks (hammer taps) that run thru the record? Lends a downright weird edge, but luckily doesn't ruin the track, which is practically bulletproof in its perfection.

The song itself is a variation of the "traditional" song "Bottle Up And Go"; Hooker recorded several variations of this theme throughout his career, and the single was a one-off for Berkeley, CA label Galaxy (an offshoot of Fantasy Records, who were one of the few labels using colored vinyl during the early '60's)

from 1963...

JOHN LEE HOOKER - YOU GOTTA SHAKE IT UP AND GO



Tuesday, March 26, 2013

THE PLEBS - BABE I'M GONNA LEAVE YOU

"Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You" is a song that has its birth right here in the bay area; Berkeley folkie Anne Bredon wrote it in the late '50's, and while performing it on Berkeley radio station KPFA it was picked up by Janet Smith. It was at a Smith performance where Joan Baez heard the song and requested Janet Smith to provide her with a recording of the song. It's unclear whose ding it was, but when Baez' version was released on her massive selling, massively influential In Concert Part 1 LP, it was credited to "traditional". Eventually, the Baez record was amended to the proper writers credit.

The Plebs, from the outskirts of London, were formed in 1964 by former members of The Nashville Teens and Screaming Lord Sutch's Savages, and spent the year touring on their own and also backing Jerry Lee Lewis on several of his UK dates. The band only stuck around long enough to cut one 45, and the b-side was THEIR interpretation of "Babe"; once again credited to "traditional". It's a fabulous interpretation, and it showcases the mod r&b sound of the time in a brilliant way. Five years later another "traditional" credited version (and the most famous of all) was released by Led Zeppelin. Fortunately, many years later Anne Bredon was given her rightful songwriting credit, and an accompanying check for a massive amount of cash.

from 1964...

THE PLEBS - BABE I'M GONNA LEAVE YOU

Monday, March 25, 2013

BROTHERS OF SOUL - I'D BE GRATEFUL


This is one of those records that digs its hooks into me from the first opening drum figure, perks up the ears during the intro, and melts my heart when the vocals come in. Put simply, this is the type of record that I'm grateful for, as it makes life *that* much better because it exists.



Brothers Of Soul were Fred Bridges (the leader, who had been performing music since his early adolescence), Ben Knight and Robert Eaton. Shortly before the release of this disc they were known as The Creations ("A Dream") but the name change was inspired by graffiti from the Detroit riots; black business owners would have signs saying "soul brother" on their store fronts as a way to prevent their businesses from being vandalized. While these Brothers Of Soul performed music that was not political, their name was a powerful statement nonetheless.

from 1969...

BROTHERS OF SOUL - I'D BE GRATEFUL

Sunday, March 24, 2013

LITTLE EVA - JUST A LITTLE GIRL

Cut from a similar cloth as Goffin-King's "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow', this under appreciated gem from Little Eva's catalog takes a message that packs quite an emotional wallop. Unfortunately, the song was buried as a b-side of the rather inane "Old Smokey Locomotion" (a sad attempt to follow up her previous years smash hit). A real pity, as Eva's powerhouse voice is shown to far greater effect on a record like this, and its unfortunate that she was burdened with such piffles for follow ups after the brilliance of her first two a-sides ("Locomotion" and "Keep Your Hands Off My Baby")

Plus, this record makes for one of the very first uses of the Gibson-made Maestro Fuzztone (the buzzy guitar tone which gives the song a very edgy vibe), a full two years before it changed EVERYTHING as heard on the Stones "Saitisfaction".

from 1963...

LITTLE EVA - JUST A LITTLE GIRL

Friday, March 22, 2013

A.C. REED - MY BABY'S BEEN CHEATING

A.C Reed (born Aaron Corthen) is probably best known as sax man for Buddy Guy (1967-1977), then later with Son Seals and Albert Collins. In addition to his work in bands (including his own until his death in 1994), Reed cut a few r&b singles during the 60's.

This side finds the band in an intense workout with some POUNDING four-on-the-floor drumming; wish I knew who the band was on this cut, but I have no idea.

from 1966...

A.C. REED - MY BABY'S BEEN CHEATING


Thursday, March 21, 2013

THE 3 DEGREES - ARE YOU SATIS-FIED


(originally published 7/31/09)

While it's fun to own and collect "rare" records, I am always the first one to say that I love hit records of the sixties just as much as deep rarities. Just because a record is rare and sells for lots of money certainly doesn't make it great! Many super expensive 45's make me scratch my head at WHY they are so valuable. But, of course, there's also a few really expensive ones that more than likely I'll never be able to afford.

That said, I am proud to say that this is one of the rarest 45's in my collection, but it's SO GOOD. This was released right around the time that tiny little Swan records went belly up so more than likely very few got pressed. This song is yet another example of a song that with the right exposure probably would have been a massive hit. The song was written by the late great General Johnson, he of The Showmen and Chairmen Of The Board.

The 3 Degrees were formed in Philadelphia in 1963 and went through a few lineup changes (I believe this is their final record with the original lineup) before settling into their hit making mid '70's soul-disco sound.

from 1966...

THE 3 DEGREES - ARE YOU SATIS-FIED?

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

SISTER GAIL ANDERSON - YOU'RE BARKING UP THE WRONG TREE

I believe that Gail Anderson is a San Francisco Bay Area native; she released a small handful of 45's on bay area and (in this case) Los Angeles based labels.

With such a fantastic voice, one would think she would have had more chances to record! This super funky workout showcases her range and power on top of a super cool song (with great lyrics).

from 1976...

SISTER GAIL ANDERSON - YOU'RE BARKING UP THE WRONG TREE


Tuesday, March 19, 2013

THE TEMPESTS - LONG LIVE OUR LOVE

The southern coastal "Beach Music" scene is closest thing that the United States has had to the English Northern Soul movement was actually coinciding with the era, and not a revivalist movement (although it has lived on to the present day, just like Northern Soul).

From a historical perspective, the beach scene not only celebrated great music (in a nutshell, the sound centers around breezy, happy sounding soul/r&b that sets the mood for dances with the Atlantic ocean as backdrop) but was also significant in its racial integration. Not only was it normal for people of different skin tones to party together, but many groups were integrated as well, just as The Tempests were.

Singer Hazel Martin was backed by a ten-piece showband, and their output on Smash Records (which included the great LP Would You Believe, which itself contains the Northern Soul anthem 'Someday") is the epitome of the beach sound.

"Long Live Our Love" has the type of easy shuffling groove that easily brings to mind the vision of a warm evening dancing on the pier on an endless summer night. It's truly glorious stuff, and the honey-like voice of Hazel Martin is a thing of wonder.

from 1968...

THE TEMPESTS - LONG LIVE OUR LOVE


Monday, March 18, 2013

BARBARA LYNN - MELLOW FEELING (PART 1)


(originally posted 3/18/09)

UPDATE SINCE THE FIRST POSTING:Jazzman Records HAS issued this song on their Soul Spectrum comp, mastered off of my very own 45.

Barbara Lynn is certainly no stranger to this blog!

Seems as though I have featured more of her singles on this blog than any other artist. No way for me to hide how much I love her.

I am very happy to say that after a long period of either being outbid on ebay for it (and also thinking GASP do I really want to pay THAT MUCH for this record????) I'm now the proud owner of this 45 that is said there are about 20 known copies of. It's NEVER been reissued or included on any comps (I'd like to fix that- if anyone who produces reissues is reading, please email me. I would love to see this get reissued somehow).

Of course, just because something is RARE doesn't mean I want to listen to it! This infectious record absolutely slays me!

This record was cut after Barbara Lynn moved to L.A and was comfortably settled into motherhood and only gigging locally, occasionally. There was a LONG period (about 5 years) where she didn't record anything, and there was a gap of another 4 years or so after this.

from 1979...

BARBARA LYNN - MELLOW FEELING (PART 1)

Sunday, March 17, 2013

THE BROADWAYS - GOIN', GOIN', GONE

I don't quite understand what was goin', goin' ON during the avant garde intro of this track (which probably diminished its chances for radio success), but the ten seconds of banging around and string drone is practically an accidental precursor to the psychedelic era. Especially odd for a lovely soul ballad!

Beautiful harmonies, complex melodic structure, unique chord changes- this is one sophisticated record!

The Broadways released two singles on MGM, and they promptly faded into the Asbury Park, NJ club scene. Lead singer Billy Brown was also gainfully employed by the Ford Motor Co. Fate DID intervene for Billy, and he was scouted out to become a member of 70's hit makers The Moments, and he eventually became the "Brown" in (Moments offshoot) Ray, Goodman and Brown.

from 1966...

THE BROADWAYS - GOIN', GOIN', GONE

Saturday, March 16, 2013

TITUS TURNER - SPORTIN' TOM

While Titus Turner's greatest claims to fame were the writing and co-writing two r&b classics (namely, writing "All Around The World"- a massive hit for Little Willie John, then co-writing "Leave My Kitten Alone" with Little Willie John himself, as well as "Sticks & Stones", cut by Ray Charles and several others), Titus Turner's own recording career spanned from 1951 until 1970, and he left behind a handful of straight r&b, "answer" records, mostly in response to Lloyd Price hits.

If you've been hangin' around here for a while, you KNOW that I love these 90 MPH, hopped up and intense r&b joints, and this one does NOT disappoint. From the opening drum roll, funky horns, then some downright RIGHTEOUS call and response female vocals, a NASTY sax solo, this record has it all; a guaranteed arse-shaker.

from 1965...

TITUS TURNER - SPORTIN' TOM


Friday, March 15, 2013

THE VONETTES - TOUCH MY HEART


(originally posted 3/24/09)

Not much was known about the lead singer of this track (a mysterious northern soul favorite for many years) until DJ/ producer Ian Levine tied the story together...

Starting life as Kendra Spotswood in New Jersey, around 1963 she met a new next door neighbor, none other than Van McCoy! Van (21 years old) began working with Kendra (then 17) on songs that he was composing. He renamed her Kenni Woods and cut her first record in 1964. They collaborated on many other projects throughout the years, under various names.

On this storming track, what sounds like a girl group is actually Kenni duetting with none other than Van himself!

She also was a touring member of the Shirelles in 1964. So, interestingly enough, this record goes hand in hand with yesterday's entry!

from 1968...

THE VONETTES - TOUCH MY HEART

Thursday, March 14, 2013

G.C. CAMERON - NO MATTER WHERE

One could easily be forgiven to think that this track from Mississippi born George Curtis Cameron was cut by Curtis Mayfield; G.C's falsetto captures such a Mayfield vibe that it's uncanny! However, the song and performance is so amazing that it doesn't fall into the trappings of an inferior copy.

Cameron's most known performance is as the lead singer on the Spinners 1970 classic 'It's A Shame", and when The Spinners left Motown, Cameron stayed on as a solo artist.

from 1973...

G.C. CAMERON - NO MATTER WHERE

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

OTIS RUSH - HOMEWORK

After the city laid out the foundation of electric blues in the late '50's thru the 1950's, Chicago blues of the 1960's turned into a whole new thing. Influenced by the budding soul music scene, the so-called "West Side" sound of Magic Sam and Buddy Guy introduced a new type of intensity and a hard swinging rhythm into a reverb drenched stew that was unique, propulsive and (in this writers opinion) the last gasp for the sound before it veered into cliche after cliche.

Otis Rush was only 27 at the time of this recording, but his career at the time had slid into a nadir after several r&b hits starting in 1956.

While it's merely speculation on my part based in no small part by my love of where the music "went" during this era, I honestly believe that these great Chicago musicians realized that in order to appeal to a younger generation it was crucial to modernize their sound, and the result was a sophistication in the music that is heard brilliantly on this side (just LISTEN to what the organ does throughout the track, not to mention the horns). If Otis' "Oh Baby's" (especially the one heard at :32) doesn't send a shiver down your spine, you may have landed at the wrong place by mistake.

from 1962...

OTIS RUSH - HOMEWORK



Tuesday, March 12, 2013

WAKEFIELD SUN - TRYPT ON LOVE


(originally posted 6/21/09)

Another one where both sides are justified for inclusion, another one in which very little is known about the band!

"Trypt On Love" (actually the b-side) has been a HUGE favorite on the northern soul scene since the 70's, but a search for info about the band yielded nothing. What a great song it is, although it was probably written as a psychedelic exploitation track.

The actual "a" side is a of the Sly & The Family Stone hit "Sing A Simple Song" and is quite good as well.

As usual, if you have any more info, PLEASE let me know!

from 1969...

WAKEFIELD SUN - TRYPT ON LOVE

Monday, March 11, 2013

CALVIN ARNOLD - SATISFY MY WOMAN

On this sweet grooving side, we find Georgia born soul impresario (singer/ songwriter/ producer/ studio owner) Calvin Arnold parlaying some very important advice that all of us fellas can live on.

from 1975...

CALVIN ARNOLD - SATISFY MY WOMAN

Sunday, March 10, 2013

THE VISITORS - I'M IN DANGER

This record is just so, well, GROOVE-Y. One of those cuts that just shuffles along and brings a smile to the face.

The success of the Chi-Lites brought about a glorious resurgence of group harmony within the already fertile Chicago soul scene, spawning a whole crop of fabulous records. Given the sound, it's no surprise that the record was arranged by Willie Henderson (he worked often with Carl Davis on arrangements for the likes of The Chi-Lites and Barbara Acklin to name but two), and the main Chi-Lite himself, Eugene Record, producing. Other than the fact of two releases on the Dakar label, I'm afraid that I know nothing of the Visitors. Thankfully, we have this reminder of their fabulous sound, which rates in the upper echelon of sweet soul.

from 1969...

THE VISITORS - I'M IN DANGER



Friday, March 8, 2013

Get your copy of "Soul Shangri-La" by my band, The Bang Girl Group Revue- VINYL, CD, or D/L







Soul Shangri-La
, the debut album from The Bang is available NOW! We are now offering this album as a limited edition vinyl, CD or download.






Of course we are most enamored of the vinyl release. This is a 100% analog production- recorded to tape, mixed to tape and cut to vinyl from the master tapes (not a digital transfer). The stunning artwork features a hand drawn logo and photo border by Galine Tumasova, and is simply stunning on a 12"X12" cover.

US Purchase Soul Shangri-La on vinyl:







International purchase, vinyl:








CD:
US purchase:








international:







Sample audio from the LP:






Reviews:

"San Francisco's underground music scene boasts the most ardent devotees of the resurgence of the '60's girl group sound. The Bang Girl Group Revue is the city's best period-correct recreationist ensemble, with nary an anachronism. But rather than just rehash old covers, The Bang also recharges this ilk of music with timeless-sounding originals. "Another Notch On His Belt" opens like The Ronettes fronting the Animals. Singers Angeline King, Rachel Mae Havens and Tish Peterson sing soulfully about finding strength in the middle of a crush as a groovy organ grinds alongside stylish guitar leads. Once you look past the palpable chemistry of the three front women, it becomes evident that The Bang has a secret weapon in guitarist Derek See. Dexterous and versatile, he owns his vintage tones while effortlessly segueing from the mid-'60's mod fuzz that buzzes around the psych-soul of "No Matter What You Do" to creamy soul smoothness in an outstanding take on Billy Dawn Smith's "Make It for The Door". A heavy cover of Sharon Tandy's freakbeat gem "Hold On" bookends this amazing debut" -Eric Shea, iTunes Notes



"A surprisingly great little set – one that definitely lives up to the retro feel of the cover, and which has a soulful sound we really didn't expect! The trio are more of a soul act than a girl group pop outfit – and they get some sharp backing here by a quartet of funk-steeped players who really help keep just the right sound for the record – a mode that has plenty of 60s soul touches in the instrumentation, which definitely seems to inspire the vocal performance as well! And even though the singers may look a bit stodgy on the front, they really know how to wail together – and really have a way of stretching out and soaring whenever one of them takes the lead. Titles include "Not Your Fool", "Another Notch On His Belt", "No Mater What You Do", "Make It For The Door", "Let Me Down Easy", "Hold On", and "Needle In A Haystack"." -Dusty Groove Online



"The Bang have released a single off their upcoming album Shimmy Soul Shangri La. The Bang is an homage to the girl groups of the sixties, such as Martha Reeves and the Vandellas and the Supremes. The three female vocalists, Angeline King, Rachel Mae Havens, and Tish Peterson, are the stars of the show, but a driving force behind the band is guitarist Derek See. See is the purveyor of the fantastic Derek’s Daily 45 (a must-read blog if you’re into classic soul) and a DJ with gigs internationally. As if that wasn’t enough, he’s also the personal guitar tech for James Williamson of Iggy and the Stooges." - Russell Jelinek, The Bay Bridged



"Drink In Hand" by The Bang Girl Group Revue starts with a strong blast of "woo-woos" evocative of a glorious era of go-going girl power, although The Ronettes probably never declared "Tequila makes me catty...brandy makes me angry" and "the kind of guy I prefer is a drinking man". The vocals- Angeline King, Tish Peterson and Rachel Mae Havens- power along with a punchy beat before making way for a vintage Yardbirds-style guitar break. The band's first album, "Soul Shangri-La", is out this month, and proves that Derek See and mates want to go beyond retro nostalgia to reinvigorate the genre" -MSG, San Jose Metro



"This will be out soon. I have heard the final mixes of these tracks and this is superb. The title of the album leads one to expect ’60s girl group and r’n‘b stylings and while that’s hugely present, what’s also present here is the country-rock hints prevalent in guitarist Derek See‘s previous band The Careless Hearts (who have backed the legendary James Williamson from Iggy and The Stooges). It’s a great combination that makes for a fun album." - Matthew Berlyant, The Big Takeover

ERMA FRANKLIN - DON'T WAIT TOO LONG


Sadly, Erma Franklin never achieved the massive success of her younger sister Aretha, but talent certainly ran HIGH in the Franklin family, as Erma's voice was as husky as Aretha's was brassy.

Erma's biggest hit was the original recording of "Piece Of My Heart", but she also sang backups on many of Aretha's greatest hits.

While still in high school, Erma was offered the first recording contract by Berry Gordy for what was to become the Tamla/ Motown empire. Her father (the reverend C L Franklin) would not allow this, and encouraged Erma to stay in school. Who knows how different fate would have been...

On this track, Erma belts out some serious vocal prowess over some downright frighteningly intense, rhythm and blues.

from 1962...

ERMA FRANKLIN - DON'T WAIT TOO LONG

Thursday, March 7, 2013

SAM & KITTY - I'VE GOT SOMETHING GOOD


This is a Chicago record, but beyond the real names of the performers (Leroy Dandridge & Edith Brown), not a whole lot is known about the duo.

While the lyrics couldn't be more simple, the message is effective and with a stomping beat like this, what else really matters?

from 1966...

SAM & KITTY - I'VE GOT SOMETHING GOOD



 

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

THE WEBS - GIVE IN


(originally posted July 2009)
The Webs made the trip fro San Antonio, TX to New York City, and cut a string of excellent 45's for Verve and Atlantic records which never received the success they deserved.

From the intro, you KNOW this track means business, and it establishes a groove so deep it's no sense fighting it, you HAVE to fall in. The vocals are top notch, freaky syncopated organ chops, and LOUD guitar that's practically punk rock. They don't get any better than this jam.

from 1967...

THE WEBS - GIVE IN

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

POPULAR FIVE - I'M A LOVE MAKER

While it may take a fairly large amount of self-confidence to deliver the type of braggadocio as heard in the lyrics here (delivered smoothly by lead singer Warren Wilson), the bubbling groove that drives the song along no doubt helps power the boasts! The rumbling, manic bass guitar on the track SOUNDS like love making as well...

Unfortunately, Popular Five did not live up their name and had very little commercial success for their four 45 releases, although the roots of the group run deep, as vocalist Jimmy Keyes was an original member of doo wop group The Chords.

from 1968...

POPULAR FIVE - I'M A LOVE MAKER

Monday, March 4, 2013

EDDIE FLOYD - PROVE IT TO ME

Here it is, 1977, and we find Memphis soul veteran Eddie Floyd practically inventing the rock-soul sound of Prince, one full year before the Purple One's debut!

While this song was relegated to b-side status, it's great to hear Eddie Floyd show off the power of his rich voice on top of an excellent, funky arrangement (courtesy of the legendary New Orleans raconteur Wardell Quezergue).

Eddie Floyd was new to Malaco Records at this point, as Stax had shut its doors for good two years prior, and after a dcade of struggle-hit song-struggle, Malaco had finally gained a strong footing financially thanks to the worldwide success of Dorothy Moore's amazing "Misty Blue". Turned out that Malaco became a sanctuary of sorts to southern soul, blues and gospel artists who were able to retain their raw edges in a recording world that had rapidly changed and lost a whole lot of soul as a whole.

from 1977...

EDDIE FLOYD - PROVE IT TO ME

Sunday, March 3, 2013

WALLACE BROTHERS - PRECIOUS WORDS

"Precious Words" sounds like it's straight out of the church, but with secular lyrics. The disc was the second release from the teenage Wallace Brothers (featuring several actual Wallace brothers- including Ervin on vocals and guitar, plus cousin Johnny Simon (also on vocals).

Raw and emotional, this disc epitomizes southern soul music.

from 1964...

WALLACE BROTHERS - PRECIOUS WORDS

Saturday, March 2, 2013

THE SHINDOGS - JUST WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE

Along with Hoss Allen's The !!!! Beat, Shindig, as hosted by the ultra-cool DJ Jimmy O'Neill, were the two greatest music programs of the '60's.

For two glorious years ('65-'66), Shindig broke ground not only as a cutting-edge, hip program, but one that also featured a racially integrated house band, and one that brought black singers into prime time in a way that was respectful and FUN.

The Shindogs were the house band, and they backed up many of the artists who appeared on the show. The group was loaded with a revolving door of heavy talents such as Glen Campbell, Delaney Bramlett, Leon Russell (pre-beard), Billy Preston, James Burton (and plenty of others).

Thankfully, The Shindogs were able to cut their own ACE 45, which I proudly present today as a bit of a late tribute to Jimmy O'Neill who passed away in January of this year.

The British Invasion-inspired beat is irresistible here, the vocals are superb, and once the guitar break hits, the song transports us all back to 1965, and I for one don't plan on coming back.

from 1965...

THE SHINDOGS - JUST WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE

Friday, March 1, 2013

BILLY (THE KID) EMERSON - EVERY WOMAN I KNOW

Well before the time this record was released (itself a remake of a record Billy cut on Sun Records in 1955), Florida born Billy (The Kid Emerson) was a veteran of the US Navy (WWII), US Airforce, was a Sun Records artist (during which time he wrote the rockabilly classic "Red Hot"), and also did time as a member of Ike Turner's Kings Of Rhythm. All this BEFORE 1955, in fact!

Around '55, Billy moved to Chicago where he signed to Vee Jay records (then later Chess), and while he was successful songwriter and live performer, his own records didn't make much of a dent. In '66 he started his own record label (Tarpon) of which this was the debut. He also released Denise LaSalle excellent "A Love Reputation" during the same year.

This remake is hot stuff indeed, and nicely updated the number into an intense mid-60's r&b workout.

from 1966...

BILLY (THE KID) EMERSON - EVERY WOMAN I KNOW